Memories of Mrs Buckett

Writing in the WI Scrapbook in 1958, Mrs Buckett remembers hearing how:
When the fishing season finished, the adventurous characters took to making trips to France on dark nights for their livelihood.

Writing in the WI Scrapbook in 1958, Mrs Buckett remembers hearing how:

When the fishing season finished, the adventurous characters took to making trips to France on dark nights for their livelihood. This was usually to the Cherbourg peninsula where three gallon tubs were purchased for 10 shillings each and were tied in pairs ready for carrying when landed here.

In 1930 Jack Seely remembers David Hookey, the blacksmith, saying ‘My grandfather said things were not so unhappy as you might think in those days; the smuggling was a real help to all classes.’ He was talking, probably, of the period 1830-1850, when a crewman earned £3 to £5 a trip and a tub carrier earned from two shillings and sixpence to five shillings for a night’s work. This was at a time when agricultural wages were about ten shillings a week.